Ten Facts About LIU Post, Part IV

By Rebecca Martelotti
Assistant Features Editor

1) The Winnick House, the former Post estate’s lavish Tudor-era revival mansion, was a symbol of Marjorie Merriweather’s preeminent social and financial status in the early 20th century.

2) In 1921, Marjorie Merriweather and her second husband, Edward F. Hutton, who worked on Wall Street, purchased a Wheatley Hills property for $400,000, which would later become Brookville Hall.

3) The couple renamed the estate Hillwood due to its rolling hills and wooded terrain.

A student break-dances on the Labyrinth located next to the Winnick Mansion

A student break-dances on the Labyrinth located next to the Winnick Mansion

4) The front door of the Winnick Dining Hall contains carvings of a court jester, a fox and hunter, and cornucopias with flowers.

5) When LIU purchased the property from the Post family, they barely made any changes to the mansion. They built an entrance on the west side, which became the Provost’s Office and is now the Admissions Office.

6) What was once Marjorie Merriweather’s master bedroom in the mansion is now the Chancellor’s Office.

7) The doll house on campus is actually called Deen-Wee. It was built in 1934 for Marjorie’s daughter, Nedenia, as a playhouse. It is made of timber and was meant to look like the larger mansion. The structure is still on the campus today.

8) The building that is named Kumble Hall today was originally a guesthouse known as Post Cottage, and was once considered the nicest building on the property. The university kept the original structure, with the exception of a brick addition that was connected to the rear of the structure in 1960 by LIU Post.

9) The campus used to have many greenhouses that were built in 1928. However, due to the deterioration of the greenhouses they were removed by the university on July 20, 2001.

10) The structure that currently houses the LIU Post Campus Craft Center was originally an estate garage which included a repair shop. The building’s appearance remains exactly the same besides the enlargement of its structure to the classroom usage.

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Categories: Features

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