Campus Dress Code

By Jenesia McNeil
Staff Writer

"Students should be entitled to wear whatever they want, but at the same time, people should care about their personal appearances. " - Brittany Rose Ward, Junior, Adolescant Math Education Major

“Students should be entitled to wear whatever they want, but at the same time, people should care about their personal appearances. “
– Brittany Rose Ward,
Junior, Adolescant Math Education Major

Everyone has a daily routine they commit themselves to in the morning before leaving their dorm or home, whether it’s a cup of coffee before a shower or reading the paper after rolling out of bed. For many people, the hardest part of the morning is finding something to wear. Coordinating the “best” outfit of the day can take a great deal of time and effort. For women, making sure your shoes match your bag and the color of your new fall sweater compliments the pattern in your shirt takes great diligence. Then there are those individuals who couldn’t care less whether their shirt matches their pants, and more about just get- ting through the day so that they can get back in their pajamas to catch an episode of Greys Anatomy. To alleviate all of this stress: should there be a dress code for students to abide by at school? Paul Quinn College located in Dallas, Texas has a strict dress code to ensure students are always “career ready.” From 8 a.m. to 5.30p.m., students at Paul Quinn College are dressed business causal. Students that take night classes are also subject to this rule. Articles of clothing such as hats, hoods, do-rags or skull caps are forbidden in campus buildings.

LIU Post students and faculty generally claim that students should be free to wear whatever they want to school, ensuring their comfort.

Khadija Greenidge, a junior Business Administration and Marketing major, is not favor of a dress code at Post. “College is a place of freedom, not confinement,” she said. Students are supposed to be individuals. Enforcing a dress code limits a student’s expression and creativity. “Besides, I don’t like wearing the same thing every day,” Greenidge added. Students should be able to express themselves however they see it best. The choice in wardrobe is a perfect example of such expression.

There are some students, though, who would not mind the enforcement of a dress code at Post. Amanda Kloos, a senior Music major and a desk attendant at the concierge as well as at both Post Hall and the Suites, said, “Uniforms should be enforced while classes are in session.” Uniforms suggest unity in a school and do not single anybody out. Dress code is representative of your position and status. It shows that you are always career ready, that any given moment you can be interviewed for a position. It makes you feel good. “Being a well-known school, it gives a bad name to the school when represented poorly by bad clothing.” A dress code shows prestige and honor for what it is you are a part of.

Kloos believes that dress codes help students concentrate in class. “It helps concentration in class, instead of focusing on somebody’s appearance,” she said. “There is no way I will be focused if a buff guy walks into class with a tank top on. I’ll be focused on the buff guy in the tank top rather than what the professor is saying.”

Professors also have opinions on a dress code at Post. Dante Moratto, a professor in the department of Media Arts, said, “I have no issue with the way Post students dress. Students should be aware and respectable of their surroundings. Students know to limit their dress code to a certain degree when attending school. There is a level of modesty expected from students and apparel when attending class.”

I feel that there is no need for a dress code at Post. Students should recognize that they attend a university of prestige and should dress accordingly. Students should dress as if they are going into their occupation every day. This prepares them for what is to come in their near future.

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Categories: Opinions

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