Dance for Cerebral Palsy

By Kristen Linsalata
News Editor

The LIU Post Newman Catholic Community Club is hosting a dance for Cerebral Palsy in the Tilles Center Atrium on March 26 from 6 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. The event is being held to raise awareness for cerebral palsy, and to give the students of LIU Post the opportunity to experience something that will truly change their perspective on mental health, according to Maggie Garcia, an undeclared sophomore and the treasurer of the Newman Club.

Members of the Newman Club dance the night away with patients afflicted with cerebral palsy at their third annual dance for the disease (2014.) Photo: Keanna Daly

Members of the Newman Club dance the night away with patients afflicted with cerebral palsy at their third annual dance
for the disease (2014.)
Photo: Keanna Daly

More than 100 people who have cerebral palsy will participate in the event, which they consider to be their “prom.” There will be about 30 vans that are wheelchair accessible carrying about four or five people each from residences all over Long Island who are associated with United Cerebral Palsy, a nonprofit agency in New York City.

“Do you remember how excited you were for your high school prom? This is exactly how they feel. They look forward to this day all year [long]! The whole dance is just an amazing way to dance and sing like nobody is watching,” Garcia said.

“Who doesn’t love to dance?” Garcia asked. “Using “dance” as a way to gain awareness for this disability is our way to show that even with all the struggles and disabilities we face in life, dancing and great music is one of the ways we can all come together.”

The dance for Cerebral Palsy is just one of the ways that the Newman Club tries to raise awareness to important issues. “The purpose behind this event and most of our events is to bring awareness and help those in need,” said Reyna Romero, a sophomore Early Childhood Education major, and Vice President of the Newman Club. “Not only through our special event like [the dance for cerebral palsy], but many others like our soup kitchens, [whose] main purpose is to feed the hungry.”

Garcia said that matters of religion and race are irrelevant when it comes to what really matters. “It does not matter what religion or race you affiliate yourself with, we all have one thing in common: the need to make a change,” she said.

Advertisements


Categories: News

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: