The Bad Weather Semester

By Joseph Iemma
Staff Writer

Six Below with a chance of snow? Yep, we had that; eight degrees, a week in a deep freeze? Yep, we also had that; school, class, practice? Ha, yeah we barely had a full week of that!

Photo by Tia-Mona Greene

Photo by Tia-Mona Greene

This past winter has been one of the worst on record in the history of New York, according to weather.com. Oh, and it gets worse: this winter was the coldest winter on record for the entire eastern seaboard. It was even 39 degrees in Miami one night in early February. It was one of those winters when one would say, “Hey, maybe this whole global warming thing doesn’t sound so bad after all.”

With all that said, as a student body, we somehow found our way out of the tundra and into the classroom. So I ask you, how did this modern day Ice Age affect you? Could you make it to class? I posed these questions to both commuters, and students who dorm at LIU Post, and the responses; well, they were passionate.

Bradley Thompson, a freshman Biology major who commutes to Post five times a week from Queens, disclosed how turbulent and treacherous his daily commute was, and how the trouble started just outside his house.

“I live in an apartment in Flushing, and my landlord never ever salts our staircase,” Thompson said. “So before I can even get to my car, I have to cross a manmade ice rink.” He drives a 1997 Honda Accord with heat that is off and on; usually more off than on. “Sometimes my car wouldn’t start, and I would have to take the bus to campus because I cannot miss Bio lab no matter what the cost may be.” Mind you, from Flushing to Post by bus is nearly a two-hour commute. One can’t help but admire the valiant efforts made by Thompson to be present by the time attendance was taken in his class.

Mother Nature showed no mercy this semester, even for those who live in the dorms. Aletta Salerini, a freshman Liberal Arts major, lives in Nassau Hall. She recalled the longest half mile walk of her life.

“I was running late to my sociology class,” Salerini said, which is held across campus over at the Kahn Discovery Hall. “I was underdressed, literally, I was wearing leggings, a tee-shirt and an old fleece.” Although one can’t help but wonder why anyone would leave their residence in that attire, on a frigid, 22-degree morning, Salerini later went on to tell me that she sprinted from Nassau to Kahn in under six minutes. Impressive? Yes.

However, according to Salerini, her eyes were iced over, fingers near frozen, and she could barely feel her cheeks. Moral of the story, wear an actual winter jacket! But I commend my fellow classmate for her valiant effort to make it to class.

Although, professors had no problem assigning homework on these makeshift snow days, they had trouble making it to campus too.

“The Northern State was turned into a ski ramp,” said Sandy Held, a Broadcasting and Media Arts professor. “You had to see it! Cars were sliding all over the place. Thankfully I had all-wheel drive, or else I might have been in serious trouble.”

Jorge Rosario, a Spanish professor, said, “If you can’t make it here because of the snow, I understand, I will not hold it against you.” So there you have it folks, professors actually have feelings, and go through the same hardships as you sometimes — cut them some slack, too.

Despite Long Island turning into an iceberg this winter, there was a recurring theme when it came to all those who had an obligation to Post. Whether it be students or professors, everyone tried to make it to campus. This speaks volumes of our campus; everyone did their best to keep functioning fibers of post intact. It is also worth mentioning Post’s grounds crew and public safety, who are perhaps the unsung heroes of this winter. They did their best to keep Post up and running, and never conceding to Mother Nature’s unforgiving cold streak.

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Categories: Features

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